DNA and a dogged detective

Longtime Alberni reporter Shayne Morrow (left) reveals the pioneering role an RCMP officer played in the early use of DNA when he solved an old case of rape and murder. Reviewed by Kathryn Neilson. FULL STORY

Please follow and like us:

Home is where the art is

March 06th, 2018

Claudette Lauzon’s book The Unmaking of Home in Contemporary Art (University of Toronto Press, 2017) was featured at the Audain Gallery in Vancouver in March of 2018 when Lauzon read excerpts from the book and reflected on recent artworks that employ the figure of home as a strategy for mediating legacies and conditions of human suffering.

According to publicity materials: “In The Unmaking of Home in Contemporary Art  Lauzon embarks on a transnational analysis of contemporary artworks that challenge the assumption of home as a stable site of belonging. Addressing a range of artists including Mona Hatoum, Ursula Biemann, Doris Salcedo, and Emily Jacir, Lauzon posits that contemporary art offers a unique set of responses to questions of home and belonging in an increasingly unwelcome world. In their practices, the book suggests, home figures as a silent, incomplete, and unstable witness to the brutalities of history that nevertheless conveys an insistent desire to shelter human memory, however imperfectly.”

As an assistant professor of contemporary art history in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University, Claudette Lauzon, in 2018, was co-editor of two forthcoming books: Through Post-Atomic Eyes (with John O’Brian) and Sustainable Tools for Precarious Times: Performance Actions in the Americas (with Karen Zaointz and Natalie Alvarez). Another book project, Eyes in the Sky, examines cultures of surveillance and militarization through the lens of critical posthumanism.

IMAGE / BOOK COVER: Doris Salcedo, 1550 Chairs Stacked Between Buildings, 2002

Please follow and like us:
  • About Us

    BC BookLook is an independent website dedicated to continuously promoting the literary culture of British Columbia.
Facebook
Twitter